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Ezra Torres
Ezra Torres

End-to-End QoS Network Design: Quality Of Servi... ^HOT^



The book starts with a brief background of network infrastructure evolution and the subsequent need for QoS. It then goes on to cover the various QoS features and tools currently available and comments on their evolution and direction. The QoS requirements of voice, interactive and streaming video, and multiple classes of data applications are presented, along with an overview of the nature and effects of various types of DoS and worm attacks. QoS best-practice design principles are introduced to show how QoS mechanisms can be strategically deployed end-to-end to address application requirements while mitigating network attacks. The next section focuses on how these strategic design principles are applied to campus LAN QoS design. Considerations and detailed design recommendations specific to the access, distribution, and core layers of an enterprise campus network are presented. Private WAN QoS design is discussed in the following section, where WAN-specific considerations and detailed QoS designs are presented for leased-lines, Frame Relay, ATM, ATM-to-FR Service Interworking, and ISDN networks. Branch-specific designs include Cisco SAFE recommendations for using Network-Based Application Recognition (NBAR) for known-worm identification and policing. The final section covers Layer 3 VPN QoS design-for both MPLS and IPSec VPNs. As businesses are migrating to VPNs to meet their wide-area networking needs at lower costs, considerations specific to these topologies are required to be reflected in their customer-edge QoS designs. MPLS VPN QoS design is examined from both the enterprise and service provider's perspectives. Additionally, IPSec VPN QoS designs cover site-to-site and teleworker contexts.




End-to-End QoS Network Design: Quality of Servi...



The key to success is end-to-end quality of service, all the way from master initiation through memory and back. Arteris implements end-to-end QoS through the interconnect and the FlexMem Multi-Array Memory Scheduler, which is tightly coupled to the NoC interconnect.


Tim Szigeti, CCIE No. 9794, is a technical leader at Cisco within the Enterprise Systems Engineering (ESE) team, where he has spent the last decade specializing in quality of service technologies. His current role is to design network architectures for the next wave of media applications, including TelePresence, IP video surveillance, digital media systems, and desktop video. He has coauthored many technical papers, including the Cisco Enterprise QoS Design Guide and the Cisco TelePresence Network Systems Design Guide, and the Cisco Press book End-to-End QoS Network Design. Tim holds a bachelor of commerce degree in management information systems from the University of British Columbia.


Enterprise networks need to provide predictable and measurable services as applications -- such as voice, video and delay-sensitive data -- to traverse a network. Organizations use QoS to meet the traffic requirements of sensitive applications, such as real-time voice and video, and to prevent the degradation of quality caused by packet loss, delay and jitter.


Network architecture also affects how an organization implements QoS. A Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network includes a private link that offers end-to-end QoS along a single path. SLAs for MPLS specify bandwidth, QoS, latency and uptime. However, an MPLS can be expensive for organizations.


Certain QoS mechanisms can manage data traffic quality and maintain the QoS requirements specified in SLAs. QoS mechanisms fall under specific categories depending on the roles they play in managing the network.


Traffic congestion across a network will significantly impact media quality. A lack of bandwidth leads to performance degradation and a poor user experience. As Azure Virtual Desktop adoption and usage grows, use Log Analytics to identify problems and then make adjustments using QoS and selective bandwidth additions.


Once all network devices are using the same classifications, markings, and priorities, it's possible to reduce or eliminate delays, dropped packets, and jitter. From the RDP perspective, the essential configuration step is the classification and marking of packets. However, for end-to-end QoS to be successful, you also need to align the RDP configuration with the underlying network configuration carefully.The DSCP value tells a correspondingly configured network what priority to give a packet or stream.


Quality of service (QoS) is the description or measurement of the overall performance of a service, such as a telephony or computer network, or a cloud computing service, particularly the performance seen by the users of the network. To quantitatively measure quality of service, several related aspects of the network service are often considered, such as packet loss, bit rate, throughput, transmission delay, availability, jitter, etc.


In the field of computer networking and other packet-switched telecommunication networks, quality of service refers to traffic prioritization and resource reservation control mechanisms rather than the achieved service quality. Quality of service is the ability to provide different priorities to different applications, users, or data flows, or to guarantee a certain level of performance to a data flow.


In the field of telephony, quality of service was defined by the ITU in 1994.[1] Quality of service comprises requirements on all the aspects of a connection, such as service response time, loss, signal-to-noise ratio, crosstalk, echo, interrupts, frequency response, loudness levels, and so on. A subset of telephony QoS is grade of service (GoS) requirements, which comprises aspects of a connection relating to capacity and coverage of a network, for example guaranteed maximum blocking probability and outage probability.[2]


In the field of computer networking and other packet-switched telecommunication networks, teletraffic engineering refers to traffic prioritization and resource reservation control mechanisms rather than the achieved service quality. Quality of service is the ability to provide different priorities to different applications, users, or data flows, or to guarantee a certain level of performance to a data flow. For example, a required bit rate, delay, delay variation, packet loss or bit error rates may be guaranteed. Quality of service is important for real-time streaming multimedia applications such as voice over IP, multiplayer online games and IPTV, since these often require fixed bit rate and are delay sensitive. Quality of service is especially important in networks where the capacity is a limited resource, for example in cellular data communication.


A best-effort network or service does not support quality of service. An alternative to complex QoS control mechanisms is to provide high quality communication over a best-effort network by over-provisioning the capacity so that it is sufficient for the expected peak traffic load. The resulting absence of network congestion reduces or eliminates the need for QoS mechanisms.


In packet-switched networks, quality of service is affected by various factors, which can be divided into human and technical factors. Human factors include: stability of service quality, availability of service, waiting times and user information. Technical factors include: reliability, scalability, effectiveness, maintainability and network congestion.[4]


An alternative to complex QoS control mechanisms is to provide high quality communication by generously over-provisioning a network so that capacity is based on peak traffic load estimates. This approach is simple for networks with predictable peak loads. This calculation may need to appreciate demanding applications that can compensate for variations in bandwidth and delay with large receive buffers, which is often possible for example in video streaming.


Commercial VoIP services are often competitive with traditional telephone service in terms of call quality even without QoS mechanisms in use on the user's connection to their ISP and the VoIP provider's connection to a different ISP. Under high load conditions, however, VoIP may degrade to cell-phone quality or worse. The mathematics of packet traffic indicate that network requires just 60% more raw capacity under conservative assumptions.[5] 041b061a72


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